Water resources

Ground water

Content API RSS Feed

Vietnam facing water security challenges

Vietnam’s demand for water is skyrocketing while water resources are being depleted, certain river basins are being overexploited and competition for water resources is soaring. The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment said in a report that the basins of some rivers like Ma, Huong and Dong Nai are being overused during dry months. The report, which came out on January 9, issues a warning against significant impact on the lives of many people as underground water resources are being overexploited, water pollution is worsening, and upstream forests are overexploited, leading to water shortages in the dry season and flash floods and landslides in the rainy season. Climate change, rising sea levels and saltwater intrusion have left strong impact on aquaculture in many parts of the country, inflicting huge damage on Vietnam’s agriculture in 2016. The environment ministry pinpoints another worrying issue: rapid land degradation. South-central provinces are facing a rapid pickup of desertification and the Mekong Delta is struggling with land subsidence and flooding, affecting socio-economic development.

Keep reading

...

Salinization threatens Vietnam’s Mekong Delta

Officials from the water resource department in the Mekong Delta province of Tien Giang inspect saltwater intrusion.

Saltwater has intruded into a large section of a major river in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta, threatening the livelihoods of local residents. Saline water has spread to some 20 kilometers of the Tien (Front) River, with locals now bracing themselves for an extended drought and further salinization. The Mekong River splits into two at Phnom Penh to form the Tien River, the main northern branch, and the Hau River, the primary southern distributor, after entering Vietnam. The two rivers remain the primary source of fresh water for both agriculture and daily consumption by residents of the Mekong Delta. A delegation from the Water Resource Department in Tien Giang Province, which is heavily affected by saltwater intrusion, has recorded a high salt content along the Tien River since November 13. The salinity level in the affected section was between 1.77 and six grams per liter of water, which is above the average amount in previous years, said Nguyen Thien Phap, head of the provincial water resource department.

Keep reading

...

Irrigation systems all pumped up for dry season agriculture

Irrigation systems will be able to supply water to about 180,000 hectares of crops this dry season, even though some systems are in need of repair. About 120,000 hectares of the irrigated land will be given over to rice, while other crops will be cultivated on the remainder, according to the Irrigation Department. Department officials are concerned that the prolonged dry spell could lead to a shortage of water in some irrigation reservoirs but are confident that many pumping stations will continue to function. Last dry season, irrigation systems were able to deliver water to about 113,000 hectares of rice although farmers planted rice on only about 99,000 hectares or 88 percent of the area targeted, and 659 hectares of rice was damaged, the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry said. To ensure that farmers grow more rice this dry season and to ensure a good quality crop, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry Dr Lien Thikeo has instructed the relevant sectors in Vientiane and all provinces, especially those responsible for agriculture and forestry and rural development and poverty eradication, to actively encourage farmers to harvest their wet season rice and prepare to plant dry season crops.

Keep reading

...

Eight countries agree on irrigation scheme

The group of ministers from four countries visit Huai Hong Khrai Royal Development Study Centre in Chiang Mai’s Doi Saket district yesterday to learn the projects initiated by HM the King.

Eight countries signed a ministerial declaration in Chiang Mai on November 6 to cooperate on improving irrigation systems among member countries to ensure food and water security. A high-level advisory group on “Partnerships for Agriculture Water Management” was established by the Chiang Mai Declaration to facilitate improved agricultural water productivity and management. It aims to ensure food security according to sustainable development goals, amid fears of water scarcity caused by climate change. Meanwhile, ministers from four countries visited the Huai Hong Khrai Royal Development Study Centre in Chiang Mai’s Doi Saket district yesterday to learn about a sustainable water and agriculture project initiated by HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Ministers from Ethiopia, Indonesia, Nepal, Bhutan and Sudan visited the centre.

Keep reading

 

 
...

Experts warn of water scarcity

Low levels at dams could lead to problems if resources not carefully managed. While there is enough water available, resources have to be managed very carefully, as water experts have warned that mismanagement could result in serious problems. Sucharit Koontanakulvong, head of water resources engineering at Chulalongkorn University, pointed out that even though the water level in our reservoirs looks positive, the authorities should be careful as the current level of water in dams was still quite low. The Bhumibol Dam, one of the country's major reservoirs, is just about 38 per cent full. Other key dams namely Sirikit, Pasak Jolasid and Kwai Noi, are also less than half full. "As predicted there will be more rain throughout September and some places can be hit by flash floods. However, from October onwards, the precipitation will fall and we will enter the dry season," Sucharit said. Floods have already hit many provinces such as Phichit, Phitsanulok and Prachin Buri.

Keep reading

...

Melting glaciers may impact hydropower plans

The Karakorum glaciers [image courtesy earthobservatory.nasa.gov]

The World Water Week has put the focus back into shrinking glaciers but the jury is still out on the impacts they will have on the flow in snow-fed rivers and hydropower generation. Glaciers are retreating due to climate change. What does that mean for water flow in the streams and rivers downhill? The effect is very varied, says Arthur Lutz of the Netherlands-based think tank Future Water. To start with, the importance of glacier meltwater to the rivers below is not the same everywhere, he said at a session on glaciers and hydropower at the ongoing World Water Week in Stockholm. It is far more important for rivers in the Indus basin than for those in the Ganga and Brahmaputra basins. Then, the effect of this glacier retreat also varies from catchment to catchment, he added.

Keep reading

...

More than half of south Asia's groundwater too contaminated to use – study

Fifteen to twenty million wells extract water from the Indo-Gangetic basin every year. Photograph: Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

Salinity and arsenic affect 60% of underground supply across vast Indo-Gangetic Basin, according to research published in Nature Geoscience. Sixty per cent of the groundwater in a river basin supporting more than 750 million people in Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh is not drinkable or usable for irrigation, researchers have said. The biggest threat to groundwater in the Indo-Gangetic Basin, named after the Indus and Ganges rivers, is not depletion but contamination, they reported in the journal Nature Geoscience. “The two main concerns are salinity and arsenic,” the authors of the study wrote. Up to a depth of 200m, some 23% of the groundwater stored in the basin is too salty, and about 37% “is affected by arsenic at toxic concentrations”, they said.

Keep reading

 

...

World water week to focus on achieving sustainable development goals

Muntinlupa City residents fill up plastic containers with water from artesian wells due to a two-week water supply shortage in many parts of the city. (Jansen Romero)

The 2016 World Water Week kicked off on August 29, focusing on water to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Opening the event, Secretary General of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Angel Gurria said that water, from having been a subject that was rarely discussed with urgency, has come to the front and centre of international deliberations. “Water now has the place it needs to have in international priorities,” said Gurria. Sweden’s Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom reinforced the message that water is a connector and an enabler in realizing the SDGs.

Keep reading

...

Diverting the Mekong River into Thailand: The Khong-Loei-Chi-Mun project

3-e1463013131838

Recently, the Royal Irrigation Department has reinvigorated its irrigation plans through the “Mekong-Loei-Chi-Mun River Management and Diversion by Gravity in the Northeast” project. It entails diverting water from the Mekong River’s mainstream into the Loei River in Northeastern Thailand, which would then be connected via tunnels to the Chi and Mun Rivers. According to official project statistics, the plan would expand the Northeast’s irrigated agricultural zone by almost 50,000 square kilometers.

Keep reading

...

Digging deeper wells costs more

A child uses a groundwater pump to fill a water bottle last year. With the Kingdom facing water shortages and reliance on groundwater increasing, authorities are concerned the government’s relief budget will not be enough to cover the cost of deeper water wells. Hong Menea

Amid a devastating drought, the need to dig more, and deeper, wells is threatening to overwhelm the government’s relief budget. The cost of wells rises exponentially with depth. And as groundwater continues to drop, itself exacerbated by the digging of more and more wells, deeper is the only place to go. Men Neary Sopheak, deputy-general of the Cambodia Red Cross, said that the CRC is working with provincial authorities to dig between 20 and 200 wells in affected villages or communes.

Keep reading

...
Contact us

Contact us

Do you have a question that Open Development Mekong can help answer? We will gladly help you.

Have you found a technical problem or issue on the Open Development Mekong website?

Tell us how we're doing.

Do you have resources that could help expand the Open Development Mekong website? We will review any map data, laws, articles, and documents that we do not yet have and see if we can implement them into our site. Please make sure the resources are in the public domain or fall under a Creative Commons license.

File was deleted
ERROR!

Disclaimer: Open Development Mekong will thoroughly review all submitted resources for integrity and relevancy before the resources are hosted. All hosted resources will be in the public domain, or licensed under Creative Commons. We thank you for your support.

* The idea box couldn't be blank! Something's gone wrong, Please Resubmit the form!

Thank you for taking the time to get in contact!